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FORGET ME …. FORGET ME NOT:  NUTRITIONAL DEFICIENCIES TO WATCH FOR IN THE ELDERLY

Advances in medical science has increased human life expectancy. With advancing age there is risk of chronic brain diseases and immune dysfunction. Normal aging does cause some decrease in memory but there is definitely increased risk of Alzheimer’s dementia with advance age. The prevalence of dementia worldwide is estimated to double every 20 years, and expected to increase to 115 million affected individuals by 2050. Current drug treatments do not stop the disease process hence there is a urgent need to use alternative therapies to prevent, slow or try stop the brain degeneration.  Diet and lifestyle  interventions have potential to be a safe, cheap and effective alternatives to expensive medications with possible side effects.

Omega 3 fatty acids that is DHA- Docosahexaenoic acid and EPA ( eicosapentaenoic acid) are good for brain health by helping in formation of synapses amongst brain cells. Omega 3 fatty acids along with other nutrients such as uridine and choline can restore synapses and memory based on research published in a major European research journal.

Zinc is an essential Bioelement that is abundant in the brain. It is part of many enzymes carrying out hundreds of biological processes in the brain. Zinc dysregulation can play a role in Alzheimer’s disease, ALS, Depression and other brain disorders. Zinc levels frequently are low in elderly due to malnutrition and malabsorption due to decreased gut function with age.

Deficiency of B vitamins such as B1, B2, B5, B6 and B12 can cause defective brain energy metabolism and sometimes cause memory decline. This can be corrected with adequate supplementation with active B vitamins that can then boost energy production in the brain that can boost other cell processes.

Vitamin D deficiency can cause memory decline in elderly. Vitamin D regulates Calcium and Magnesium balance which has a key role in flow of electrical impulse across the brain cell membranes.

Rajiv Sharma MD

dhagastro.com

drguthappiness.com

REFERENCES

Impact of Flavonoids on Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Age-Related Cognitive Decline and Neurodegeneration

Curr Nutr Rep. 2018; 7(2): 49–57.

Synaps formation in the brain can be enhanced by co-administering three specific nutrients

DR RICHARD WURTMAN , EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACOLOGY Volume 817, 15 December 2017, Pages 20-21

Neurology. 2012 Sep 25;79(13):1397-405.

Vitamin D, cognition, and dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Balion C1, Griffith LEStrifler LHenderson MPatterson CHeckman GLlewellyn DJRaina P.

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